Viewing entries tagged
Settler colonialism

Kia Kaha te Reo Māori: The Cultural Conservation in Māori Language Week

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Kia Kaha te Reo Māori: The Cultural Conservation in Māori Language Week

Ellen Allerton explores the complex cultural politics and public debates surrounding Māori Language Week, part of a larger effort to grapple with New Zealand’s history of colonization. While the promotion of te reo Māori (the Māori language) has generated both expressions of cultural pride and conservative backlash, it also involves troubling examples of what Allerton calls “commodification of the culture through performances and feasts that are meant purely to attract tourists.”

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“They’ll Take the Sea From Us”: A Nautical Glimpse Into Palestine’s Colonial Confinement

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“They’ll Take the Sea From Us”: A Nautical Glimpse Into Palestine’s Colonial Confinement

By John Collins

“In the past, fishing was better, because we could go out 12 nautical miles and no one targeted us,” observes one of the young Gazan fisherman. “Now, it’s only six miles and there’s no fish there.” This basic fact - the literal shrinking of the space within which people in Gaza can engage in fishing without risking harassment and death at the hands of the Israeli military - lies at the core of “Six Miles Out,” a striking new video released on Facebook last week by the We Are Not Numbers project (whose work has been featured previously here on the Weave News site).

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Interweaving: Somdeep Sen on Race, Fieldwork, and Colonization in Israel/Palestine

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Interweaving: Somdeep Sen on Race, Fieldwork, and Colonization in Israel/Palestine

By John Collins

As part of our occasional series of “Interweaving” conversations, I recently had the opportunity to interview Dr. Somdeep Sen, a Weave News blogger and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen, regarding a number of issues related to his field research in Palestine/Israel. Our conversation touched on his experience of the politics of race and violence while in the field as well as his first-hand observations from Jerusalem and the West Bank regarding the current state of Israel's settler-colonial project.

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